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How to control your anaerobic research in demanding test environments

If your research facility requires a controlled environment for oxygen sensitive microbiology, biological product containment or isolation control, it can be difficult to continually sustain a stable anaerobic atmosphere.

Creating a controlled environment for anaerobic cell culture research in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries can bring challenges in technique and scale.

Anaerobic chambers are designed to allow reliable control of atmospheric gas, temperature and humidity, making them ideal for environmental simulation to grow microorganisms without oxygen.

Having a controlled environment chamber is a precision tool that has been used to research biomass, biofuels and bioremediation, and also in drug discovery and infectious disease identification. Researchers in microbiology have described how anaerobic chambers have been instrumental in the study of biological responses to anaerobic parameters. [1]

If your facility performs anaerobic microbiological research in food processing, plant growth or antibiotic treatment of microscopic disease agents, consider using anaerobic chambers for a precise and dependable environment.


Anaerobic chambers operate with a variety of components working together to create a controlled environment that can perform anaerobic microbiologic research.

Gas lines are used to supply hydrogen gas mixed with carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas. The chambers are equipped with a catalyst fan box that circulates and heats the gases inside the chamber to remove oxygen by converting hydrogen and oxygen into water. The catalyst box unit can also control the temperature by improving the air circulation inside the chamber.

For anaerobic chambers to work effectively, an airlock must be used for gas interchange and to lock either automatically or semi-manually. The airlock helps maintain anaerobic conditions in the internal atmosphere, even during a simple sample transfer.

The environmental conditions created inside anaerobic chambers have many applications for use in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, such as:

  • Plant growth
  • Pharmaceutical testing
  • Expiration date testing
  • Shelf life testing
  • Living cell study
  • Plant seedling
  • Bacterial culturing.

The Bioline Global range of Anaerobic Chambers

The Coy Anaerobic Chambers supplied in the Bioline Global Premium range are long-lasting, reliable and designed with the highest quality.

Anaerobic chambers were developed more than 40 years ago at the University of Michigan in the US. A local engineer, Dick Coy, built an anaerobic chamber to help a researcher supply anaerobes to assist his study of anaerobic organisms in mouse intestines. [2]

Since then the Coy Anaerobic Chamber has evolved to meet the changing needs of local, and eventually global researchers. The first and still most well-known anaerobic chamber is the vinyl chamber that can expand and contract using less gas during volume changes. Rigid chambers were developed later for specialised applications, which are made of aluminum or a rigid polymer to allow the use of caustic chemicals.

The chambers are built to create an anaerobic atmosphere of 0 to 5 ppm of oxygen, which is maintained by the hydrogen gas mix reacting with a palladium catalyst to remove excess oxygen.

The other features of the Bioline Global range of Coy Anaerobic Chambers include:

  • Automatic vacuum air-lock with moisture trap
  • Heated or unheated chamber versions
  • Flexible vinyl chamber
  • Availability in different sizes with a modular design for different configurations to suit most laboratories
  • Low gas consumption and operating costs
  • Clear chamber for clear vision
  • Glove ports.

All of the chambers come with a 12-month warranty.

To find out more about the Bioline Global range of Coy Anaerobic Chambers or to speak to one of our friendly and experience technicians, please contact us at 1800 210 805 or via our online contact form.

[1]        Speers MA, Cologgi DL, & Reguera G Anaerobic Cell Culture Cur Protoc Microbiol 2009; Appendix 4:Appendix 4F
[2]        Bioline Product Overview; Anaerobic Chamber – Coy (CoyLabs) Anaerobic Chambers 2012 available at http://www.biolineglobal.com.au/controlled-environments-for-laboratories/anaerobic-chambers/anaerobic-chamber-7250220.html

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